Why am I focusing on convict conditioning?

Because it is fully in line with a mobile, location independent lifestyle. Occam’s Protocol requires fifteen minutes to get to the gym x 2, plus a 20 minute workout plus the cost of the gym membership = More not less! I will be combining 1 (or possibly 2) short Occam’s Protocol sessions each week with this calisthenic program and I predict much better results in much less time. Good by vacation gut!

Today we are going to look at the squats portion from the book Convict Conditioning. You can see the first (pushups portion) in my last post.

Some of you may be tempted to just launch into your training by scanning the exercises in
this book, maybe discovering the hardest techniques you can do, or just attempting
whatever catches your eye and looks cool. This is not training. This is playing.
Training requires discipline and focus. It requires the discrimination to know where to start, the knowledge of what to do, the insight into when to really push, and the wisdom to understand when to stop. It requires regime. – Paul “The Coach” Wade

Here is a quick summary of the 6 “Core Movements”

  1. Pushups
  2. Squats
  3. Pull Ups
  4. Leg Raises
  5. Bridges
  6. Handstand Pushups

Today we are going to focus on the second of “The Big Six Movements”:

Movement Two: Squats

This is meant to be a supplement to the book as it is imperative to understand the correct implementation of each movement and the history behind them.

You can preview and download the Convict Conditioning Movement Two Squat Cheat Sheet Here.

1. Shoulderstand Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 10
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 25
  3. Progression Standard 3 sets of 50
ShoulderStand Squats

2. Jacknife Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 10
  2. Intermediate Standard 2 sets of 20
  3. Progression Standard 3 sets of 40
2 Jacknife Squats

3. Supported Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 10
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 15
  3. Progression Standard: 3 sets of 30
3 Supported Squats

4. Half Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 8
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 35
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 50
4 Half Squats

5. Full Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 30
5 Full Squats

6. Close Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 20
6 Close Squats

7. Uneven Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5 (both sides)
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10 (both sides)
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 20 (both sides)
7 Uneven Squats

8. 1/2 One-Leg Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5 (both sides)
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10 (both sides)
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 20 (both sides)
8 One Half One Leg Squats

9. Assisted One Leg Squats 

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5 (both sides)
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10 (both sides)
  3. Progression Standard: 2 sets of 20 (both sides)
9 Assisted One Leg Squats
10. Master Step: One Leg Squats

  1. Beginner Standard: 1 set of 5 (both sides)
  2. Intermediate Standard: 2 sets of 10 (both sides)
  3. Master: 2 sets of 50 (both sides)
Master Step One Leg Squats

 

Preview and download the second of 7 upcoming Convict Conditioning Cheat Sheets Here.


Training Programs: (for the Busy “Convict”)

The New Blood (Step 1) Good Behavior (Step 2)
The New Blood Training Schedule Good Behavior Training Schedule
  • Practice this program, or a similar routine, during your early work on the ten steps.
  • Once you get past Step 6 on all four of the exercises mentioned, it’s time to move to the next program.
• Good Behavior can be worked into almost anybody’s busy schedule.
• This program can (and should) be used by any athlete to achieve solid strength gains-no matter how advanced they are.
The Veterano (step 3) Solitary Confinement (step 4)
The Veterano Trainig Schedule Solitary confinement convict conditioning
  • This workout is good for those with limited time on their hands. Sessions can often be completed
    in under six or seven minutes per day!
  • Recovery is actually pretty fast during this program because the athlete never works the upper
    or lower body two days in a row. The exercises alternate in the most efficient manner possible.
  • For athletes looking to gain strength and work their way up through the ten steps, this routine
    can be very productive. Because only one exercise is performed on a given day, the athlete can
    really focus and give his all.
  • This program includes ancillary work for the grip, neck, and calves. If you like the idea of trying these extras, but can’t take the daily workload, add a day’s rest between training sessions, or whenever you feel the need .
  • This program is mean. Unless you are in good shape and living clean-regular meals, plenty of sleep, etc.-be prepared to get bullied, big time.

 

Best of luck, and if you are reading this in jail, please let us know in the comments section below so I can figure out a way to send you updates!  Smile

 


 

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